The Guardians

For a little something different this week, I thought I would share a day of finds with some of our deep feelings on “stuff”.  Many times Deb and I speak of “rescuing” things.  Orphan linens, bits of paper memorabilia, the stuff of everyday lives.  We consider ourselves the guardians of these items, our duty to save them for the future.  After they have lived with us for a while, they will travel to new homes where someone else can love them.  We both have a willingness to repatriate things at any time, if we feel they really belong to someone else.  Thus passing on a tablecloth to someone who is using a Christmas cloth inappropriately (you know who you are!), or a certain breed of dog figure finding a new home with a fan of that breed, etc.

A couple of weeks ago, I spotted the estate sale of my former next-door neighbor being held at his hanger in the local air park.  I really did like this nice old gentleman and wanted a little something to remember him by, so we headed to the sale.

This first find seemed a bit large, so I looked around some more:

Flying AceGotta mention that he built this plane from scratch, and did fly it on a regular basis till he was too old to do it.  Hope it finds a good home.

Deb and I whine about “guys” garage sales, and this one was no exception.  Prices so high, they were going to get nothing sold, but I did manage to find some household things that were obviously priced by the ladies of the family.  Here is a whole box of goodies for only a dollar:

Box o goodiesAnd the rest of the take for that sale:

The rest of the lootAll the things priced at just a dollar each, so for $5.00 I felt pretty good.  Now let’s examine things a bit closer.  Deb and I both just love these little 30’s pictures with the little sayings on them.  We both have several, and this will hang on my wall to remember my nice neighbor, Leonard.  I love the sentiment, as what home is complete without friends?

Home is where the friends areThese next two items needed to be purchased just because!

Perfect box and moreReally, how could you resist the Mystic Perfume Ring Disseminator?  Sounds like something out of Summer Blockbuster Super Hero movie doesn’t it?  The perfume actually still smells nice, like orange blossoms, after all these years.  Little perfect boxes of stuff always amuse us.

And as for this:

Don't askI am not sure what part of the rabbit is incorporated into it, but it was not so lucky for the rabbit.  But, the bead work is so cool and touristy, and the little stamp was tucked into the box as well, so how could you go wrong?  I am not sure what I am going to do with it, but I like it!

Now let’s return to that first box.  I just glanced in it quickly at the sale, and thought the little hankies were sweet, so a buck well spent.  Here they are spread out a bit:

Spread outI love the paper cranes on the large one.  The others are silk and very thin, so you can see through them.

Then there was this:

What's behind those greetingsWell, you know, lots of times there are old Christmas cards tucked away in places.  Then I opened it!

SurpriseA perfect 1946 Esquire Calendar with illustrations by Alberto Varga.  My all time favorite pin up artist!  I just scanned the first few, but the rest are every bit as cute.  That was worth the price of admission right there!!!!

Then, if you notice, in the first photo, there are some old yellowed looking papers.  When I unfolded them, I found two charming letters from a Japanese lady to Leonard.  I knew he was in WWII, so he must have met her in Japan while stationed there.   That explains the Japanese hankies.  I spent some time thinking about the letters.  He had never married, so I figured there would be no one to be hurt by them.  Luckily, I was able to contact his relatives, as there were still cleaning up his home.  I discovered that they knew about this woman, and even had a photo of her with Leonard.  I returned the letters and the braided sash in the first photo, as they said they had her Obi as well.  As a guardian, I had done my duty!  Just for fun, and with permission, I scanned the letters and include them here:

Letter1Letter2I am so glad I knew the family, got the letters and was able to return them.  Imagine how hard it would have been if a perfect stranger got a hold of them?  After all that, it seems sort of anticlimactic to include anything else, but I am going to, as it was a bumper crop sale day.

Tagging along, down the street, was a sale of Antiques with a capital A.  They had some fun stuff and some fun prices to go along with them, but I did score this wonderful basket, and the carved wooden bunny box:

Next SaleI must say that rabbit looks a little ticked at the basket sharing his limelight.  I had some doubts about some of the things on sale, and owner admitted to some refinishing and copying, so I didn’t pay much for these, so can love them no matter what.

Also hit an end-of-the-day estate sale.  Just a few fun things.  We always pick and choose the tiny things that perhaps aren’t priced as high as they should be, so we feel the bargains belong to us!

And One moreNotice how well my dolls scored!  A Strombecker wooden chair, a hand-blown vase and a set of olive wood goblets and covered bowl.  They always get the best stuff.  For me a gorgy Matisse copper and enamel bracelet.  Not a bad day if I say so myself.  Wonder what next week will bring?  That’s always the lure isn’t it?

For all our American friends, we want to wish you all a SAFE and happy 4th of July, and happy hunting, as always.

 

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10 Responses to The Guardians

  1. Monica says:

    The little pictures with sayings are often Buzza Mottos. They were mostly done by a company that was in Minneapolis. I had a friend who had a couple dozen of them on a wall.

    • kathy & deb says:

      Thanks Monica–I had no idea that one company did most of them! We love it when people with knowledge share.

  2. Anny says:

    The Japanese lady friend letters are priceless!

    • kathy & deb says:

      Kathy was so happy that the nephew knew about her. How sad that they were separated and he never married.

  3. tkarengold says:

    The letters made me sad. Sad to think that he should have taken her to America.
    T

    • kathy & deb says:

      I thought it was so sad too; he never married. There was a tremendous amount of prejudice against the Japanese during and after the war, but I think I would have risked it for love.

  4. Carol schwartz says:

    I feel a need to rescue things and return them to the appropriate caretakers. I recently contacted a church about a booklet of their congregation members from 1875 and sent it to them.

    I bought a box of photos at a yard sale locally. Imagine my surprise to find my late Aunt’s high school photo in the box. I am in the process of getting it back to her daughter. The person I bought the photos from was my aunt’s friend so the picture is signed to her. My cousin may have the photo but not one her mother actually wrote on. Many of the other photos are of my husband’s boss’ family. There were differences in the family and they weren’t on good terms so they didn’t have any of the photos. I will be getting those back to the family.

    I bought a box of sheet music. In it was a baby book from 1901. It has enough information that I am trying to locate the family to see if they would like it back.

    Carol

    • kathy & deb says:

      Wow Carol–you really are a guardian!! When you enjoy pictures and ephemera like we do (and apparently you do too) it’s amazing what you find tucked in with it. Good work with your rescuing; it’s reassuring to hear from like-minded readers.

  5. I think it is so wonderful you rescued those letters! To me something like that is simply priceless. I love family stories. I think that is why I am drawn so much to genealogy. It is sad to think they never got together. Perhaps they are finally together now.

    • kathy & deb says:

      What a nice way to think about their romance. Right after WWII being Japanese in the US must have been difficult at best, so it’s hard to second guess their choices. 😦

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